INL FPU Closing Ceremony Building Blocks

BUILDING BLOCKS FOR BRIEF REMARKS INL FPU Closing/Graduation Ceremony at CEOMP
April 10th, 2015, 08:30 am

Good morning and welcome to this graduation ceremony for the XXX. It is an honor for me to be here with you once more, this time to take part today.

The program you just completed was developed by the State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement, known as INL. In Africa, INL projects support the efforts of governments which partner with the United States of America to respond effectively to the growing demand for peace and security. To this end, we focus on four main objectives. We assist African partners in combating transnational organized crime, drug trafficking, and terrorism, and their effects. We support post-conflict stabilization operations and security sector reform. We strengthen criminal justice systems to be accountable to the public and to respect human rights. And, we promote regional cooperation.

In the end, INL programs like the one promote strong, professional, and self-sustaining criminal justice and related institutions in Africa. They address existing and emerging security threats in a humane, transparent, and equitable manner.
Here in Togo, the United States continues to support the Togolese government’s initiative to further develop its international peacekeeping operation capacity.

We provided US support in the current INL program is 1.5 million dollars, which includes equipment, a building refurbishment, and instructors for 3 trainings of FPUs. The previous FPUs have deployed to Mali and Darfur.

This seven-week course trained the entire unit as a whole. Through a simultaneous train-the-trainer program, the Togolese army can now develop its own capacity to conduct these trainings independently in the future. INL training includes the promotion of human rights and the rule of law, and supports the peacekeeping process in African conflict areas such as Mali and Darfur (this one going to Mali – “MINUSMA”).

The Togolese trainers are rapidly taking on more and more responsibility and leadership in the training environment and should be commended for their dedication and hard work.

Togo’s Formed Police Units not only contribute to bringing peace and stability, but by their very presence and by their attitudes and behavior, they set an example of responsible, ethical, and effective policing in a challenging environment, far from home. The training and experience these peacekeepers gain will continue to contribute to Togolese security in the future.
I would like to thank…